1920’s Home Renovation Portfolio of before and after photos (bathroom)

Continuing my series of portfolio pictures of what was accomplished at the 1920’s duplex, one of the major transformations occurred in the bathroom.  Everything was white:  original hexagonal tile, white shower, white paint and white sink and white tongue and groove plank wood walls.  I struggled initially with the emotional decision as to whether I should retain some of the original elements for historical purposes but I decided it was best for rental value, and considering what was there was in bad shape, to go ahead and modernize the space a bit.

Here’s what was done to transform this room:  1)  All fixtures and finishes were removed except the medicine cabinet and tile 2) new travertine tile was installed directly over the old tile 3) new toilet, vanity, lighting and fixtures 4) had a plumber help to replace old galvanized pipes in walls and under foundation for new shower  5) installed new step in shower pan, backboard and tile for shower 6) instead of going back with mini-blinds, I used a frosted window film that I found that gives privacy yet lets the natural light shine in uncluttered.

Details:  wall paint color-Mushroom Bisque, oil rubbed bronze fixtures by Danze, Medicine cabinet and shower trims painted Espresso brown, shower tile is a combo of blanco tumbled marble and a glass mosaic I found at Lowe’s

Before: 

Shower

Vanity area

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Published in: on June 15, 2011 at 9:18 am  Comments (3)  
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How to make a corner shower shelf using tile

If you don’t want the cluttered look  of a shower basket hanging off of your shower arm or can’t afford a pre-fabricated recessed niche when tiling your new shower, an easy and great solution would be to build a corner shelf using the same tile!

Shaving ledge

 

Soap and shampoo shelf

 

 

The process is the same for a shampoo/soap shelf or a shaving ledge:

1) Determine location

Once you determine the height of your shelf, mark the location in the corner so that when you are cutting the backer board, you can leave a horizontal cut out for the shelf.  Allow enough room for the tile shelf  to slip in snugly.

2)  Cut a shelf to fit in the corner

Sometimes a 45 degree cut is all you need but if you want it larger, you may have to play with your angle a bit more.

3)  Tile up to the shelf

Tile up to the self and using a stacked spacer in the corner where both walls join, lay the tile shelf in place.  The additional spacer gives it a slight angle so that water will run off.

4)  Cut an L tip on the next tiles for the top

The little “L” helps to hold the shelf in place once its grouted.

5)  Grout as typical

 

 

Published in: on January 12, 2011 at 4:28 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Tricks and tips to use when working with natural stone tiles

There is no doubt about the natural beauty of stone tiles used in your kitchen or bath.   Unfortunately, because it is a natural product and not “man made” like porcelain tiles, the cuts and variation in size may be slight, but create havoc when trying to stay “square and level”.

Here are some tricks I have picked up when working with natural stone to make your tile job a little less frustrating:

1)   Tiles do not stay square

When a natural stone tile is not cut square, it will create “unevenness”.  Depending on the severity of the misalignment, use a toothpick on top of a spacer, a stacked tile spacer or a shim to level the tile at the top or sides. Don’t worry if your “lines” don’t look exactly the same throughout as the variation should be so slight, especially if you split the adjustment difference between the tile out of square and the next tile.  Grout hides more than you may think as long as variations are kept small.

2)   When cutting, the stone breaks before you get to the end

Many natural stone tiles are actually somewhat “soft” and crumble, chip or break easily when using a tile saw before you even finish the entire cut.  Start with a small cut at the opposite end then flip the tile to the other side.  This extra cut at the end will give it better “strength” as your cut line comes together.  Also make sure your tile is wet enough.

3)   Tiny L-shaped corners just break off

Start by cutting the smaller part of the “L” before you do the longer side.  Again, this gives the tiny part better strength when the long cut meets up.

4) ALWAYS seal your natural stone tile before grouting

Natural stone tiles are very porous.  Use a matte or glossy  sealer that is compatible with your stone (read the manufacturers label) and apply at least 2 coats and let the sealant completely dry before grouting.  This will make grout clean up a cinch.

5)  Always seal your natural stone in wet areas at least once a year.

Some sealants claim to have better waterproof longevity, but why risk it when the sealing process is so easy?  This  also helps with maintenance!

How to install a new toilet

If you are like most people, you probably never give your toilet a second thought as long as it works.   If it doesn’t work however, it can get aggravating really fast.

Once you find yourself with a leaky toilet or worse, a money flushing toilet (think lots of water used to do the job), then it may be time to think about a replacement. You might be surprised at the flushing power and water efficiency of today’s modern toilets.  For $100-150, you can install a new toilet that flushes quickly and with very little water….think 1.4 gallons!  Your water bill will thank you!  I know, I know, it’s a dirty job, but someone has to do it.   Unless you want to pay a plumber, the good news is that it is fairly easy and quick as a do-it-yourself project.

What you’ll need: New toilet, new flanged wax ring with adjustable height bolts, plumbers tape, wrench and pliers, plastic putty knife, level, shims and caulk

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Published in: on January 4, 2011 at 4:29 pm  Leave a Comment  
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